• Brand: be brave and different

Where to get the courage that real differentiation requires?

By |2019-03-19T12:22:33+00:0007.03.2019|

If you truly want a good communications strategy, you will have it.

People demand more bread and games. Haven’t we changed at all from the era of the gladiators? Considering that gladiators fights were perceived as both entertainment and an opportunity to learn practical skills, then maybe not.

According to a recent study, we want to be entertained and if possible, somehow benefit from our experiences. We also want to be able to trust OUR brand. That’s what makes it ours.

With gladiator games, you knew what you saw was real because you were there. In a virtual world, consumers need a different type of assurance. And today, brands have more both to win and to lose as their potential audiences are vastly larger than those in Roman arenas.

 

Do what Caesar did

Few of us have the courage of Caesar, but there are other resources that we can use to make a difference. Creativity and insightful long-term planning, for starters. Well-defined targets and messages. Ambassadors and a public that can turn into loyal followers.

You are only required to make clear-cut decisions – that is what Caesar did, but only after careful planning with his generals. After that, it’s the solid, intelligent and well-organized implementation of the plan that will bring it home.

There are of course a few important ingredients still to add, relevant things an understanding PR agency would suggest to you: storytelling, vivid experiences, humor and surprise. All of this on arenas where your audience is already present.

Ultimately, it’s really up to you. Do you want your brand to resemble…

  • the gladiator that lost
  • the lion that ate the gladiator
  • the bread you had for snack at the games; or
  • the sunny and memorable day full of cheers, reminding you of Caesar’s greatness?

 

Choose your own level of courage. Set your goals. If there’s a will, there’s away.

-Pia Jännes, Managing Director

 

If you want a good communications strategy, do what Caesar did